The Literary Turing Test: A Book Review of Rob Reid’s “After On”

Plenty of nerdy couples read in bed at night. Really nerdy couples might even exchange comments on their respective books. But in a sci-fi writer’s house, such nerdiness achieves whole new dimensions: “This is a flawed discussion of quantum computing,” I announced to the dark room. “It’s bedtime,” my Laddie mumbled from the pillow beside … More The Literary Turing Test: A Book Review of Rob Reid’s “After On”

Book Review: “The Ear, The Eye and the Arm” by Nancy Farmer

I recently came down with a touch of that pernicious malady sweeping the globe. Not COVID-19, thank goodness, but Lockdown Languor. It’s not the social distancing that bothers me: for a disciplined moonlight novelist with a deeply introverted partner, the normal pattern is to avoid people and stay home. The problem is that we don’t … More Book Review: “The Ear, The Eye and the Arm” by Nancy Farmer

Recent Reads: “No Time To Spare”, by Ursula K. Le Guin

My father and I call and text like typical 21st century family, but we also maintain written correspondence like 19th century intellectuals. (Occasionally we even write like them: planning a holiday visit might be phrased as “Cherished father, I propose myself the pleasure of waiting upon you and my mother this Michelmas…”). We’re both English … More Recent Reads: “No Time To Spare”, by Ursula K. Le Guin

Last Chance To See Our Planet: 30 Years, 2 Reviews, 1 Earth

Despite his popularity as a science fiction writer, the late author Douglas Adams championed the value of planet Earth. In the late 1980s, he teamed up with zoologist Mark Cawardine for a BBC radio series called Last Chance to See, in which the pair tracks endangered species around the globe. Adams’ 1990 book chronicling the … More Last Chance To See Our Planet: 30 Years, 2 Reviews, 1 Earth

Book Review: “Rise of the Rocket Girls” by Nathalia Holt

Rise of the Rocket Girls promised an intersection of two of my favorite non-fiction genres: science, and the too-often-overlooked impact of women in history. I expected a book comparable to Radium Girls, which portrays its subjects as memorable personalities in a suspenseful narrative; or Code Girls, the captivating account of female cryptologic analysts during WWII. … More Book Review: “Rise of the Rocket Girls” by Nathalia Holt

Review: “Children of Time”

“Well, now I’m going to have nightmares,” said my Laddie mildly, without taking his eyes from his Kindle. I glanced across the pillow at him. “Why?” “Because this book has giant spiders…and they’re better characters than the humans.” Adrian Tchaikovsky’s Children of Time will make even arachnophobes rethink their prejudices. Without spoiling too much of the … More Review: “Children of Time”