The Science of “Syzygy”: Terraforming

“How can you terraform long-distance?” “Robots and microbe bombs.” A gleam of enthusiasm lit Ash’s face. “It’s really cool. Our scientists engineer microorganisms that can build up the atmosphere and fix nitrogen in the soil—.” “More gene hacking.” Skye sniffed. “Didn’t you learn anything from Spores?” “Yes. That organisms can thrive even in harsh environments … Continue reading The Science of “Syzygy”: Terraforming

Sci-Fi Strikes Back: How Genre Fiction Can Combat Scientific Censorship

No longer content to misshelve his favorite fictions in the non-fiction section of our national discourse, our new Librarian in Chief now wants to ban the entire 500 class of the Dewey decimal system: science. Last week the Trump administration issued a so-called “gag order”  banning federal science institutions—including the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of Agriculture, and Department of … Continue reading Sci-Fi Strikes Back: How Genre Fiction Can Combat Scientific Censorship

Farewell to Leading Ladies of Science and Sci-Fi

As if 2016 hadn’t already stolen enough of our beloved icons, this week we said goodbye to a pair of women who changed the face of science and science fiction, respectively: astrophysicist Vera Rubin, whose work confirmed the existence of dark matter, and actress Carrie Fisher, who played Princess Leia in Star Wars. Rubin made tremendous … Continue reading Farewell to Leading Ladies of Science and Sci-Fi

The Science of “Syzygy”: Lunar Colonization

Pressing his forehead to the cool window, Ash blocked out his companions and watched the pale, pocked surface blossom into detail. Solar panels winked like fallen stars around the rim of Shackleton crater. The colony itself, a cluster of domes joined by tubelike corridors, made raised scars on the moon’s skin. Compared to the glittering seas … Continue reading The Science of “Syzygy”: Lunar Colonization